Sunday, February 18, 2018

Northern Red Oak - Quercus rubra

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 43
Northern Red Oak
Quercus rubra



Spring

This Northern Red Oak lives beside my house.  This tree is part of a group of trees I call the three sisters.

The Northern Red Oak - Quercus rubra
Summer

images coming next summer.....

Fall
The Northern Red Oak Tree


The Northern Red Oak Tree

These tall, strong trees live beside my house.  I am amazed at the amount of acorns they produced this year.  Each year is different.  This particular year (2010) was a mast year.


Winter
Northern Red Oak
The acorns of the northern red oak only take up a quarter of the acorn and appear almost beret like.

The Northern Red Oak has ridges in it's bark that appears to have shiny lines running throughout the bark from the top to the bottom.
The Northern Red Oak

One of my passions in life is to find ancient forests and share time with elder trees.  Researchers are discovering just why we need these elder trees in ancient forests in as many areas on earth as is possible.  We don't only just need them, it is imperative to the health of our planet.  I encourage you to read as much as possible.  If you find you have a passion to help our earth heal, support ancient forest protection and creation of ancient forests on earth.  
One book I just finished reading is "The Hidden Life of Trees" by Peter Wohlleben.  My eyes were open to so much I didn't know about the lives of trees.

I will be sharing other books here with you and hope you will find them as enlightening as I do.

Champion Northern Red Oak  - North Carolina Forest Service
http://ncforestservice.gov/Urban/tree_detail.asp?Tree_ID=263

North Carolina's Champion Big Tree Database

northern red oak (Quercus rubra)

County: Avery
Town: 
Owner Name: US Forest Service, Grandfather Ranger District
Nominator Name: Tony Dellinger
Native:  Yes 
Directions:  Not available 
Latitude:  Not available 
Longitude:  Not available
This tree is 150 feet tall and has a circumference of 222 feet.

Champion Big Tree Program from America Forest:
They do not a Quercus rubra listed.  Anybody have a big Northern Red Oak to submit?

For the love of the trees,
Becky



Saturday, February 17, 2018

Willow Oak - Quercus phellos

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 42
Willow Oak
Quercus phellos


Spring
Quercus phellos - The Willow Oak


The Willow Oak is similar to the other willows; however, easy to distinguish from the others by the acorns and bristle tips on the end of the leaves.

Many birds and small mammals depend on the acorns of this tree for food throughout the winter.

Quercus phellos - Willow Oak

Summer


The Willow Oak is a beautiful tree. This one lives at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, North Carolina
http://ashevillebotanicalgardens.org/wordpress_3/
The way to ID a willow oak this time of year is by the leaf. The leaf is very narrow, simple, alternate, up to 5 inches long and 1 inch wide. The leaf has a bristle tip and the margins have no teeth. The surface of the leaf is smooth and the underside may have hairs along the midrib.

The Willow Oak in the summer.

Fall


The Willow Oak Tree

The Willow Oak Tree

This tree lives at the Asheville Botanical Gardens by the Gazebo and the creek.  Today, the leaves are beautiful in red and orange.  www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org


Winter

I will be adding my Winter Photo soon....


The Champion Willow Oak in the United States.  
http://www.americanforests.org/big-trees/willow-oak-quercus-phellos-2/


WILLOW OAK

QUERCUS PHELLOS
This champion Willow Oak of Virginia made its debut on the list of American Forests Champion Trees in , as it is the largest known tree of its species in the country. By recognizing these champions, we recognize the beauty and critical ecosystem services provided by our biggest and oldest trees.

LOCATIONNorthampton, VA
Nominated byJack Wilkins
Year Nominated    2013

STATUSCHAMPION
TREE CIRCUMFERENCE328
HEIGHT105
CROWN SPREAD137
TOTAL POINTS467

For the love of the trees,
Becky


from my journal...

Chestnut Oak - Quercus montana

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 41
Chestnut Oak
Quercus montana


Spring


Quercus montana- Chestnut Oak 
Brightly colored young Chestnut Oak leaves are coming out of their buds in the spring.

Summer


The Chestnut Oak in July; the acorns are growing.

Young developing Chestnut oak acorns and late summer leaves

Fall


The Chestnut Oak and the Wheel Bugs in September
This amazing tree complete with the wheel bugs lives right outside my window. I follow the changes of the seasons with this beautiful tree. Now that it is September, its leaves are changing. The leaves have little holes in them; and the green is darker, not the same green it was when the leaves first appeared. Acorns and insects are all over the Chestnut Oak outside my window on this bright September day.

The wheel bugs are a type of assassin beetle. The wheel bug is considered a beneficial insect because it eats harmful insects, such as sawflys, aphids and Japanese beetles. It is not a good idea to handle these bugs for they bite and the bite is said to be painful. The good news is that these bugs do not come after you. They are very slow (said to be one of slowest bugs ever) and will not bother you unless you bother them.

During late summer the Wheel bugs mate and the female will lay her eggs in the twigs of the tree. The female will lay 40-200 eggs only once. She will die soon after laying her eggs and possibly eating her mate as well. Yikes! They are known to be efficient assassins; they come complete with armor, weapon, and poison for killing their prey. Thus, the name, assassin.


Winter


The Chestnut Oak in winter.


For the love of the trees,
Becky


A page from my journal


Blackjack Oak - Quercus marilandica

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 40
Blackjack Oak
Quercus marilandica



Spring


Quercus marilandica leaves and flowers

Quercus marilandica leaves and flowers

http://www.flickr.com/photos/akbuthod/2387596991/
amy_b  
The Black Jack Oak may just be one of the most beautiful Oak trees in the world; just look at that new spring growth color!!!



Summer


Blackjack Oak in Cookeville, Tennessee


Fall


This Blackjack Oak tree lives in Mountain Home, Arkansas


Winter

My winter photos and drawings will be coming soon.


For the love of the trees,
Becky




Friday, February 16, 2018

Southern Red Oak - Quercus falcata

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 39
Southern Red Oak
Quercus falcata



Spring
Southern Red Oak, Quercus falcata


Summer

Southern Red Oak, Quercus falcata

Southern Red Oak, Quercus falcata

This southern oak lives in Cookeville, Tennessee, at my Sister's house. This beautiful oak tree is probably 80 feet tall. I love this tree. It reminds of strength; probably because this tree stands so tall and strong each day through the seasons, year after year. It is beautiful, providing food and shelter for countless birds and small mammals.

The leaves of this tree are variable. However, they most always have a long narrow lobe in the center of the leave that is sometimes called a finger. The upper sides of these leaves are shiny green and the undersides are dull with felt-like hairs. The Southern Red Oak has a characteristic bell-shaped leaf base.

I want to climb a big Southern Red Oak tree, and I may just get the opportunity. I found out that Panola Mountain State Park in Georgia has a Southern Red Oak Tree Climbing program. They call it a Nocturnal Tree Top Excursion. Here is a quote from what I read:

Nocturnal Tree Top Excursion

Experience climbing trees like you never have before with a rope and harness at night.
Participants will climb a 90-foot Southern Red Oak. This nocturnal climb will include
fluorescent lichen and other glowing critters of the night, stargazing and night climbing
activities. To register in advance or for more information call 770-389-7801. $20 plus $3
parking.
Panola Mountain State Park / 2600 Ga. Hwy 155 SW, Stockbridge, GA 30281
770-389-7801



The biggest Southern Red Oak in the National Register of Big Trees is in Upson, Georgia. It has a circumference of 341 inches. It has a height of 137 feet. It has been the champion since 1996.
http://www.americanforests.org/big-trees/southern-red-oak-quercus-falcata-2/

A Southern Red Oak leaf that grows on the tree in my Mom and Sister's yard in Tennessee.  

Fall

The Southern Red Oak leaves in September.  This leaf is distinctive with the rounded base.  


Quercus falcata, Southern Red Oak in November

I sat under a 60 foot tall Southern Red Oak one morning in November.  The wind was blowing, bringing the yellow and brown oak leaves all around me.  I lifted up my arms to catch the falling leaves as the wind blew my hair all around my face.  As I looked around I noticed that all the other trees around me were bare except for the oaks.  The oaks were all contributing their leaves to the wind.  To stand under tall oak trees on a windy fall day in November is one of my lifes favorite kind of days.

Winter


Southern Red Oak


Southern Red Oak


For the love of the trees,
Becky
A Page from my journal, The Southern Red Oak

"Trees are sanctuaries. Whoever knows how to listen to them, can learn the truth."
Hermann Hesse

Another journal drawing

Scarlet Oak - Quercus coccinea

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 38
Scarlet Oak
Quercus coccinea


Summer

The Scarlet Oak Tree.  This Scarlet Oak lives at the Asheville Botanical Gardens.

Scarlet Oak that lives at the Asheville Botanical Gardens 


The Leaves: Alternate, simple, 4 to 7 inches long, very deep, bristle-tipped lobes, glossy green above, paler and glossy on the underside of the leaf. The tree usually grows up to 80 feet tall.



Fall
The Scarlet Oak Tree


The Scarlet Oak Tree

Today, I got out my macro lens to photograph the Scarlet Oak; now I know why the Scarlet Oak is called scarlet.


Winter

Scarlet Oak photo coming soon!


Spring


This Scarlet Oak lives at the Asheville Botanical Gardens.  www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org.

Early Spring Bud of the Scarlet Oak

For the love of the trees,
Becky

Thursday, February 15, 2018

White Oak - Quercus alba

Fagaceae - Beech Family
"A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 37
White Oak
Quercus alba



Summer

White Oak, Quercus alba
photo by Robert Priddy
http://www.robertpriddyphoto.com/
Fall


White Oak, Quercus alba
The sweet tasting acorns of the White Oak are the acorns of choice of many animals.

A sign of fall is when the Oak trees are filled with acorns. This incredible White Oak tree is brimming with acorns. It is said that 180 animals and birds eat Oak acorns.

The White Oak can grow up to 100 feet and live 300 years. It's leaf is easily identified by its curved lobes. The leaves will soon be changing to a purple red color. The National Champion White Oak lives in Brunswick, Virginia. It is 83 feet tall and has a circumference of 312 inches. You can read more at www.americanforests.org.

The White Oak tree in this image lives in Mountain Home, Arkansas.
  The acorns are growing still in September.
  I am glad to see so many acorns.  For I know that the wildlife will have food in the winter.


Winter


The White Oak Tree in winter still holding onto it's leaves.

The White Oak Tree in Winter.
The White Oak Tree in Winter - Quercus alba

Spring

to be included in the spring of 2018.....

For the love of the trees,

Becky





Northern Red Oak - Quercus rubra

Fagaceae - Beech Family "A Year With the Trees" - Tree Number 43 Northern Red Oak Quercus rubra Spring This Northern Red O...