Pages

Friday, July 18, 2014

Summer trees and flowers and acorns

Chestnut Oak, Quercus prinus, Quercus montana
Summer trees are so green and lush and filled with life.  Some are filled with flowers and some are growing their new acorns.  Most trees are hosting a wide many kinds of insects and birds and squirrels; you know this by all the sounds that are heard this time of year.  This is absolutely one of most favorite times of year because of all the colors and flowers and smells and sounds!   A very beautiful Chestnut Oak is right outside my window where I am sitting right now.  It is filled with mature deep green leaves that are drinking in the summer rain. There are many new acorns growing in the tree that are a light green color.  A downy woodpecker just stopped by for a visit to the Chestnut Oak as well as several titmice and chickadees.  Oh, do I love summer in the trees.

A bit of news here:
I am cancelling the class on August 2nd at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville,  I went back to work full time and have to plan future classes on days that I am not scheduled to be at work.

I will keep you posted on future classes.  Meanwhile, I will be keeping up with the tree measurements and adding the trees to the Asheville tree map.  www.ashevilletreemap.org

I will also keep posting about the Southern appalachian trees on this blog as well as editing my book, more info on that later.

Here are a few more images I recently photographed that illustrate another reason just why I love summer so very much.



Get outside and enjoy the beauty of nature this summer.  Each day is a true blessing to be alive; so take it all in.  Notice your surroundings, take a deep breath and be in the moment - a summer moment.


Sunday, June 29, 2014

Rosebay Rhododendron

The White and Pink White Flowers of the Rosebay Rhododendron were blooming this week all over Asheville and the mountains around the city.

The mountain I live on is covered in blooms that look just like this.  I think it may be one of the most beautiful woods in the whole world to see thousands of these blooms all thought out the mountains.

Rosebay Rhododendron, Rhododrendon maximum

This was the 10th tree we visited on the tree walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville in May.

The next tree walk is August 2nd.  Come on out and we will be visiting more Southern Appalachian trees.

August 2
Saturday
A Southern Appalachian Tree Walk in the Gardens,  Rebecca Priddy
10 am – 12 pm
The Botanical Gardens at Asheville

Rebecca Priddy, Certified Naturalist, will lead a walk in the Botanical Gardens and using a tree checklist, observe the Southern Appalachian trees that live here. Summer is a perfect time to observe the leaves and fruits on the trees. Come out and get to know and appreciate the trees by increasing your observation and identification skills. We will talk about being a citizen forester, the Asheville Tree Map project and the Science of Phenology. You can read more about Becky at her blog:http://ayearwiththetrees.blogspot.com. Meet at the BGA Visitor Center. Rain or Shine: bring rain gear/umbrella!Cost: BGA members: $12, Nonmembers: $17
Reservations are required
.  Contact Office Administrator at BGA for additional information and/or to register (828) 252-5190.

Friday, June 13, 2014

The White Oak Tree

The White Oak Tree

The White Oak Tree was the ninth tree we observed at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville on our May tree walk.

White Oak, Quercus alba
photo by Robert Priddy
http://www.robertpriddyphoto.com/
One of the people on the walk with me that day called this tree the Queen of the Forest.  That is a great name for this tree that can grow quite tall and looks quite majestic with its large limbs.  The acorns are sweet and eaten by wildlife; and if you are quite industrious, you could make a white oak flour to use in baking.

The leaves were all a beautiful green and new on all the white oaks on our walk that day.  One way to id the white oak is by the curved lobes on the leaves.

About the tree walks:
I will be leading two walks this year at the Botanical Gardens at Asheville.  The dates for the walks are May 17th and August 2nd.

On May 17th, 2014, at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, I led a tree walk.  My goals for the tree walks are to encourage people to get to really know the trees of the Southern Appalachian Mountains as well as to respect and appreciate them.  Getting to know the trees by observation and note taking in all four seasons is how I got to know the trees. So, that is the way I teach others to get to know the trees.

Journalling in a tree checklist is what we did that day.  We stopped and observed 20+ trees that day.  It was the first publication of my tree checklist. 

I got feedback from those that were at the tree walk; I also discovered some corrections that need to be made. A second edition is in the works and will be offered to the participants of my next tree walk to be held August 2nd at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville.

If you are going to be in the Asheville area on August 2nd, I invite you to sign up at the Botanical Gardens and come observe 20 more trees.  http://www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org/The Botanical Gardens offers other nature classes; so check them out as well.

The Mountain Laurel

The Mountain Laurel

The Mountain Laurel was the eighth tree we observed on our tree walk in May.

Mountain Laurel, Kalmia latifolia

Mountain Laurel, Kalmia latifolia
These small trees were filled with flowers while we were there.  You can find many Mountain laurels throughout the gardens.

The beautiful flowers display mother nature's stitching as each flower has intricate stitching in each flower.  I hope everyone gets to see these flowers while they are blooming in May and June.

About the tree walks:
I will be leading two walks this year at the Botanical Gardens at Asheville.  The dates for the walks are May 17th and August 2nd.

On May 17th, 2014, at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, I led a tree walk.  My goals for the tree walks are to encourage people to get to really know the trees of the Southern Appalachian Mountains as well as to respect and appreciate them.  Getting to know the trees by observation and note taking in all four seasons is how I got to know the trees. So, that is the way I teach others to get to know the trees.

Journalling in a tree checklist is what we did that day.  We stopped and observed 20+ trees that day.  It was the first publication of my tree checklist. 

I got feedback from those that were at the tree walk; I also discovered some corrections that need to be made.  So a second edition is in the works and will be offered to the participants of my next tree walk to be held August 2nd at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville.

If you are going to be in the Asheville area on August 2nd, I invite you to sign up at the Botanical Gardens and come observe 20 more trees.  http://www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org/The Botanical Gardens offers other nature classes; so check them out as well.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The Sassafras Tree

The Sassafras Tree

The Sassafras tree was the seventh tree we observed on the Tree walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville on May 17th. This tree lives on the service road next to Sunshine meadow.  The leaves were new and full and green.  

Check out the other Sassafras photos by clicking on the name of the tree in the Right sidebar. 

Sassafras, Sassafras albidum, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville

Sassafras, Sassafras albidum, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville

Sassafras, Sassafras albidum, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville

My daughter, Brooke, and I did tree measurements for the Asheville tree map.    You can find our measurements at:  http://ashevilletreemap.org/ 

On May 17th, 2014, at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, I led a tree walk.  My goals for the tree walks are to encourage people to get to really know the trees of the Southern Appalachian Mountains as well as to respect and appreciate them.  Getting to know the trees by observation and note taking in all four seasons is how I got to know the trees. So, that is the way I teach others to get to know the trees.


Journalling in a tree checklist is what we did that day.  We stopped and observed 20+ trees that day.  It was the first publication of my tree checklist. 

I got feedback from those that were at the tree walk; I also discovered some corrections that need to be made.  So a second edition is in the works and will be offered to the participants of my next tree walk to be held August 2nd at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville.

If you are going to be in the Asheville area on August 2nd, I invite you to sign up at the Botanical Gardens and come observe 20 more trees.  http://www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org/
The Botanical Gardens offers other nature classes; so check them out as well.

Thursday, June 5, 2014

The Yellow Buckeye Tree

On May 17th, 2014, at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, I led a tree walk.  My goals for the tree walks are to encourage people to get to really know the trees of the Southern Appalachian Mountains as well as to respect and appreciate them.  Getting to know the trees by observation and note taking in all four seasons is how I got to know the trees. So, that is the way I teach others to get to know the trees.


Journalling in a tree checklist is what we did that day.  We stopped and observed 20+ trees that day.  It was the first publication of my tree checklist. 

I got feedback from those that were at the tree walk; I also discovered some corrections that need to be made.  So a second edition is in the works and will be offered to the participants of my next tree walk to be held August 2nd at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville.

If you are going to be in the Asheville area on August 2nd, I invite you to sign up at the Botanical Gardens and come observe 20 more trees.  http://www.ashevillebotanicalgardens.org/
The Botanical Gardens offers other nature classes; so check them out as well.

Yellow Buckeye, Aesculus flava, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville


The Yellow Buckeye tree was the sixth tree we observed on the Tree walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville on May 17th. This tree lives on the service road next to Sunshine meadow.  We were in the right place at the right time when we observed the flowers in full bloom!

Check out the other Yellow Buckeye photos by clicking on the name of the tree in the Right sidebar. 

I went back this past Sunday and did measurements with my daughter, Brooke.  You can find our measurements at:  http://ashevilletreemap.org/  
This Yellow Buckeye is one of my favorite trees.  It was 86 inches in circumference!  The small fruits are now growing and the wild strawberrys at the base of the tree are so beautiful@

Yellow Buckeye, Aesculus flava, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville
I will be back and measuring more trees on June 29th at 2pm.  If you want to participate as a citizen scientist to help build the Asheville Tree Map, come out and join me.

more later, have fun and enjoy nature this June while so many plants are out there blooming.

Rebecca


Wednesday, June 4, 2014

The Yellowwood Tree

The Yellowwood tree was the fifth tree we observed on the Tree walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville on May 17th. This tree lives in the Sunshine meadow sort of near the gazebo.

Check out the other Yellowwood photos by clicking on the name of the tree in the Right sidebar.  This tree is the last one on the list.

Yellowwood, Cladrastis kentuckea, Asheville Botanical Gardens
The Yellowwood tree was fully leafted out in new spring/summer leaves when my daughter and I were there on June 1st.  We measured the tree for the Asheville Tree map and found our tape measure showed that three trunks all emerged from the base.  At 4 1/2 feet from the earth, we had three trunk measurements of 55 inches, 44 inches, and 37 inches.  I will be posting this info on the website for the Asheville Tree Map.

Please go to the Asheville Tree Map and add some trees yourself.  You can find this website at:



Wednesday, May 28, 2014

The Umbrella Magnolia Tree

The Umbrella Magnolia tree was the fourth tree we observed on the Tree walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville on May 17th. This tree lives in the Sunshine meadow sort of near the gazebo.

Check out the other Umbrella Magnolia photos by clicking on the name of the tree in the sidebar.

Umbrella Magnolia, Magnolia tripetala, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville.
The Umbrella Magnolia has smooth bark that gets a bit crinkled as it gets to be a big tree.






Tuesday, May 27, 2014

The Sugar Maple Tree

The Sugar Maple tree was the third tree we observed on the Tree walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville on May 17th.

Sugar Maple, Acer saccharum, The Botanical Gardens at Asheville

The lobes that are shaped like a U is a really good way to ID this tree in the summer.  On this blog, you can see other images of the Sugar Maple tree.  Check out the list of words on the side and find the tree you want to see and read about.

On June 1st, I will be measuring some of the trees we talked about on our tree walk.  These measurements will be added to the Asheville tree map.  So come on out if you want to help measure.  I will be there at 2pm.  The Botanical Gardens at Asheville is located at 151 W T Weaver Boulevard in Asheville, NC.

Check back on this blog soon for the fourth tree we observed on the Tree walk at the Botanical Gardens


Thursday, May 22, 2014

The Red Buckeye

The Tree Walk at the Botanical Gardens of Asheville - tree number 2 was the Red Buckeye.  This tree is near the Botany Center.  The red flowers were still on the tree when we visited the tree.

Aesculus pavia, Red Buckeye, The Botanical Gardens of Asheville, 

Aesculus pavia, Red Buckeye, The Botanical Gardens of Asheville